Posts Tagged: TLS 1.0

Proposal to drop TLS 1.2 support in early 2025

Proposal to deprecate Transport Layer Security TLS 1.2

Transport Layer Security – or “TLS”- is a cryptographic mechanism to facilitate secure connections and communications across the internet. For example, the https network connection between your device and secure websites or applications, like MIDAS.

Several incarnations of the Transport Layer Security protocol have been developed over the years, the most recent being 1.3:

ProtocolReleasedCurrent Status
TLS 1.01999Deprecated
TLS 1.12006Deprecated
TLS 1.22008In use since 2008
TLS 1.32018In use since 2018
TLS Protocol History

TLS 1.0 and 1.1 are now considered “legacy protocols” and “weak” by today’s cryptographic standards. That’s because they’re susceptible to several vulnerabilities. Modern web browsers automatically default to preferring more secure TLS 1.2 and 1.3 connections. In fact, they may even display a warning when connecting to a website that only supports the now obsolete TLS 1.0/1.1 protocols.

As security and cryptographic standards have evolved over the years, we have too! We’ve previously dropped support for TLS 1.0 connections to our network in 2017. We then subsequently dropped support for TLS 1.1 connections in 2020.

As part of our ongoing commitment to security, we’re now proposing to also deprecate support for TLS 1.2 connections to our client servers in early 2025. Going forward, we propose to only support TLS 1.3 (the latest Transport Layer Security protocol version) connections.

But wait.. isn’t TLS 2.0 still considered secure?

In the past few years, researchers have discovered cryptographic weakness in the ciphers and algorithms that TLS 1.2 uses.

While TLS 1.2 can still be used, it is no longer considered the most secure option. TLS 1.2 is only considered “safe” when weak ciphers and algorithms are removed.

On the other hand, TLS 1.3 supports the latest modern encryption with stronger encryption algorithms and more robust authentication mechanisms. At time of writing, it currently has no known vulnerabilities, and also offers performance improvements over TLS 1.2.

What impact would disabling TLS 2.0 support have?

Most modern browsers and operating systems support TLS 1.3.

Therefore, the vast majority of users will be unaffected by our proposal to switch off support for TLS 1.2 in early 2025. However, if you’re using an older device or operating system, you may need to take action.

Here’s a list of browsers and devices that will be affected when TLS 1.2 connections are blocked:

  • Internet Explorer: All versions of Internet Explorer do not support TLS 1.3. This should not impact any of our users, as our MIDAS software has not been supported in IE since 2019.
  • Edge Legacy: Versions of Edge Legacy prior to April 2018 do not support TLS 1.3. Users would need to update to a newer version of Edge or a different browser.
  • Safari on macOS 10.12 Sierra or earlier: These older macOS versions do not support TLS 1.3 in Safari. Users would need to upgrade their macOS or use a different browser.
  • Very old versions of other browsers: Browsers that haven’t been updated in several years might not support TLS 1.3.
  • Older Android devices: Devices running Android 9 (and earlier versions) do not support TLS 1.3.
  • Older iOS devices: Devices running iOS 12 (and earlier versions) do not support TLS 1.3.

Web browsers and devices that do support TLS 1.3:

  • Microsoft Edge (current versions): Supported since April 2018 (Edge 79+)
  • Google Chrome: Supported since April 2018 (Chrome 70+)
  • Mozilla Firefox: Supported since October 2017 (Firefox 63+)
  • Apple Safari (on macOS 10.13 High Sierra or later): Supported since September 2018 (Safari 14+)
  • Opera: Supported since April 2018 (Opera 57+)
  • Android: Android 10 (or later)
  • iOS: iOS 13 (or later)

Important Information For Hosted API users:

If you’re a cloud-hosted MIDAS customer utilizing the optional MIDAS API you may need to take action before TLS 1.2 connections to our network are disabled in early 2025.

You’ll need to ensure that your applications and the underlying programming language you develop in can support (and are correctly configured for) TLS 1.2 connections.

For instance Java 7 (1.7) (and lower) and .NET 4.7 (and lower) languages don’t support TLS 1.1/1.2.

If your applications/programming languages do not support TLS 1.3 encryption, your MIDAS API calls will begin to fail in early 2025 once we disable TLS 1.2 support across our network.

Please refer to the vendor of your programming language if you’re unsure whether it supports TLS 1.3, or for assistance enabling such support in your development environment.

Remind me again.. when is this all happening?

Currently, we are proposing to drop support for TLS 1.2 connections to our network in early 2025.

We have not fixed a specific date in 2025 for this as yet (as we want to hear from you – see below).

However, anything can change over the course of a year. Should new vulnerabilities be discovered in TLS 1.2 during 2024, this may prompt us to bring our plans to deprecate 1.2 support forward.

We Want To Hear From You!

We are currently only proposing to deprecate TLS 1.2 connections to our network in early 2025.

However, we’re open to feedback from you our users in the meantime.

If you feel you have a particular usage case that would require continued reliance on TLS 1.2 support, please reach out to us to discuss.


Disabling TLS 1.0 in early 2017

TLS stands for “Transport Layer Security” and is a cryptographic mechanism used to facilitate secure connections and communications over the internet. Several incarnations of the TLS protocol have been developed over the years (1.0, 1.1, and 1.2), with 1.0 being the oldest and now approaching the ripe old age of 18!

TLS 1.0 is now considered a “legacy protocol” and “weak” by today’s cryptographic standards, as it is susceptible to several vulnerabilities. Modern web browsers automatically default to preferring TLS 1.2 or TLS 1.1 over legacy TLS 1.0 connections, however some older browsers do not support the more modern and secure TLS 1.1/1.2 protocols.

As part of our ongoing commitment to security, in early 2017 we intend to drop support for legacy TLS 1.0 connections to our client servers. The vast majority of users will be unaffected by this change, but if you’re using an older web browser/operating system, you may need to update.

The minimum browser requirements for MIDAS v4.14 (and later) have also been updated accordingly.

The following table of web browsers provides additional guidance as to any action you may need to take to ensure you can continue to access our site/your hosted MIDAS system in 2017:

BrowserVersionComments
Microsoft Internet Explorer11OK (If you see the “Stronger security is required” error message, you may need to turn off the “Use TLS 1.0” setting via Internet Options → Advanced)
9-10OK (When running Windows 7 or newer, however you’ll need to enable TLS 1.1 and TLS 1.2 in Internet Explorer by selecting the “Use TLS 1.1” and “Use TLS 1.2” boxes via Internet Options → Advanced)
Upgrade Required (Windows Vista, XP and earlier are incompatible and cannot be configured to support TLS 1.1 or TLS 1.2 – Please update your operating system)
8 (or lower)Please update to a more recent version of Internet Explorer
Microsoft EdgeAll VersionsOK – No action required
Mozilla Firefox27+OK – No action required
23-26OK (Use about:config to enable TLS 1.1 or TLS 1.2 by updating the security.tls.version.max config value to 2 for TLS 1.1 or 3 for TLS 1.2)
22 (or lower)Please update to a more recent version of Firefox
Google Chrome (Desktop)38+OK – No action required
22-37OK – No action required (Provided you’re running Windows XP SP3, Vista, or newer, OS X 10.6 (Snow Leopard) or newer)
21 (or lower)Please update to a more recent version of Chrome
Google Chrome (Mobile)Android 5.0+ (Lollipop)OK – No action required
Android 4.4.x (KitKat)Device Dependent (Some Android 4.4.x devices may not support TLS 1.1 or higher. Please refer to your device manufacturer if unsure)
Android 4.3 (Jelly Bean) (or lower)Please update to a more recent version of Android
Apple Safari (Desktop)7+OK – No action required
6 (or lower)Please update to a more recent version of Safari
Apple Safari (iOS)iOS 5+OK – No action required
iOS 4 (or lower)Please update to a more recent version of iOS

Important Information For Hosted API users:

If you’re a cloud-hosted MIDAS customer utilizing the optional MIDAS API, please ensure that your applications and the underlying programming language you develop in can support (and are correctly configured for) TLS 1.1/1.2 connections. For instance Java 6 (1.6) (and lower) and .NET 3.5 (and lower) languages don’t support TLS 1.1/1.2.
If your applications/programming languages do not support at least TLS 1.1, your MIDAS API calls will begin to fail in early 2017 once we disable TLS 1.0.
Please refer to the vendor of your programming language if you’re unsure whether it supports TLS 1.1/1.2, or for assistance enabling such support in your development environment.

UPDATE: 1st April 2017

In advance of dropping TLS 1.0 support across our entire network this year, we’ve initially dropped TLS 1.0 support on our dedicated Service Status site. If you’re not sure whether or not you’ll still be able to access your hosted MIDAS system once TLS 1.0 support is dropped in the near future, please visit https://midas.network. If you’re able to visit this site without issue, then you’ll still be able to access MIDAS going forward.

UPDATE: 1st July 2017

As of today, our servers no longer accept TLS 1.0 connections. If you’re unable to access our site/a hosted MIDAS system, please upgrade your web browser.